Alton Sterling – No federal charges against officers in Alton Sterling death.

Location: Baton Rouge, LA
Date: July 5, 2016
Charges: No federal charges filed; state charges pending
Filmed by: Bystander’s cell phone and security cameras
Also known as: CD Man
Result: Under state investigation

Alton Sterling, a 37-year-old black man was shot several times at close range. Cell phone video showed him pinned to the ground by two white Baton Rouge Police Officers, Howie Lake II and Blane Salamoni before he was shot. Police said he was reaching for a gun.

The Justice Department announced that the officer who eventually shot Sterling first put a gun to his head when Sterling didn’t comply with orders to put his hands on the hood of a car. The video shows both officers tackled Sterling and took him to the ground, held him there then Salamoni pull his gun. Lake had tasered Sterling twice before the scuffle.

Two videos showing the incident was released to the public, but there are four other videos: two body camera recordings, a store surveillance camera, and one patrol car dashboard camera. The federal prosecutors concluded there is not enough evidence to support civil rights charges against either officer. They’d have to PROVE, beyond a reasonable doubt, that Officer Salamoni did NOT believe that Mr. Sterling was actually going for a gun, and that he simply decided to shoot him.

After 10 agonizing months hoping the two officers would be charged for his death, Alton Sterling’s relatives didn’t get the news they wanted. And they were told the case file would be given to the Louisiana Attorney General to determine whether state charges are appropriate.

Minister Gill’s comment
The Video clearly shows that this was a senseless shooting, and clearly what I consider murder. What is it going to take for people to see what is in plain sight? They were holding him down, and had him pinned to the ground then pulled the trigger and shot him. That is murder and no one can convince me otherwise no matter how much they try to twist our brains into believing their side of the story.